LISTEN DAT

I’m lucky to have such wonderful friends and fans.

As a small thank you, here’s a FREE track from Old Bayou Blues.  

You can download or listen here:

 

In this first solo recording, Camile unplugs and explores his roots with acoustic performances of the songs he grew up singing with his family and in his uncles’ band, The Dufrene Brothers. Along Bayou Lafourche in the tiny Cajun town of Raceland, Louisiana, Camile’s family gathered around the living room to sing the popular songs of the day—tunes by Fats Domino, Hank Williams, and Elvis Presley. At night, his uncles’ band, The Dufrene Brothers, played up and down the bayou at clubs like The Old Spanish Trail, where shrimp boats pulled underneath and their catches hauled up through trap doors, boiled and served to patrons hungry for seafood and dancing.
Those who have seen Camile play on the Radiators’ rare acoustic gigs, or playing along with blues legends Dave “Snaker” Ray and Tony Glover as The Back Porch Rockers, have heard a taste of his acoustic picking abilities. The Old Bayou Blues takes it to a whole other level, stripped down and snug in a down-home atmosphere.
The title song, an old Dufrene Brothers tune, written by Camile’s cousin Rosalie Toups, is a lilting expression of longing for the family’s life along the bayou. Camile also introduces three new original tunes: a pair of haunting instrumentals and Ma Patate, a ribald tribute to a vegetable sung in Cajun French-sung. (No curse words are used.) 
The track list also includes standards by Fats Domino (It’s You I Love,” I’m Walkin’), Hank Williams (Jambalaya), Bob Wills (Steel Guitar Rag), and the Don Gibson classic Oh Lonesome Me. Oddly enough, Camile had never heard Elvis’ version of Just Because, and offers up instead the family’s version sung partially in French. 
David Doucet, guitarist with the internationally-acclaimed Louisiana Cajun band Beausoleil, thickens the roux with his sterling acoustic stylings.
Spicing up the mix is classically trained Johnny Sketch and the Dirty Notes violinist Harry Hardin, master of everything from Scarlatti to bluegrass and, like Camile, an alumnus of the pioneering New Orleans Mardi Gras Indian Orchestra.